Seattle Children's Provider News

New Psychosocial Risk Section added to Seattle Children’s Discharge Summary

Community providers have asked that psychosocial risk factors in Seattle Children’s Hospital patients be better identified in patient records.

In response, and in the spirit of continuous process improvement, Seattle Children’s Hospital has added a new ‘psychosocial risk’ section to the standard inpatient discharge summary.

Here is an example to demonstrate what the new Psychosocial Risk section will look like:

New Medical Staff

new medical staff icon

New Medical Providers

  • Saif Aljabab, MB BS, University of Washington, Blood Disorders
  • Mildred Bay, MD, Ballard Pediatric Clinic, Inc, PS, General Pediatrics
  • Robyn Brand, MD, Harbor Pediatrics, General Pediatrics
  • Chelsea Davis, MD, Seattle Children’s, Pulmonary and Sleep Medicine
  • Elizabeth Flanigan, MD, MPH, University of Washington, Neonatology
  • Richard Gurich, MD, University of Washington, Orthopedics
  • Jennifer Hartz, MD, Harbor Pediatrics, General Pediatrics
  • Adam Lamble, MD, Seattle Children’s, Blood Disorders
  • Melanie Lang, MD, DDS, Harborview Medical Center, Dentistry
  • Krysten North, MD, MPH, University of Washington, Neonatology
  • Gabriel Pavey, MD, University of Washington, Orthopedics
  • Fateema Rose, MD, MS, Seattle Children’s, Gastroenterology and Hepatology
  • Jolene Rudell, MD, PhD, Harborview Medical Center, Ophthalmology
  • Dennis Ruggerie, DO, Great Falls Clinic – Main Facility, Cardiology and Cardiac Surgery
  • Kathryn Shaw, MD, University of Washington, Transplant Center
  • Louay Toni, MD, Seattle Children’s Tri-Cities Clinic, Cardiology and Cardiac Surgery

Allied Health Professionals

  • Kathleen Hennings, ARNP, Seattle Children’s, Emergency Department
  • Melinda Kratzig, ARNP, DNP, Seattle Children’s, Surgery
  • Allison Comick, ARNP, MPH, Seattle Children’s, Surgery
  • Kendra Lindeman, DNP, ARNP, Seattle Children’s, Emergency Department
  • Kaitlin Hoban, DNP, ARNP, Seattle Children’s, Surgery
  • Jane Slater, DNP, ARNP, Seattle Children’s, Neonatology
  • Adrienne Ortman, PA-C, Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, Blood Disorders
  • Kari Robertson, PA-C, Seattle Children’s, Orthopedics
  • Alphonzo Flying Cloud, PA-C, Seattle Children’s, Orthopedics

Tips for Treating Constipation and Incontinence

A Q&A With Dr. Lusine Ambartsumyan

Image of Lusine Ambartsumyan

Lusine Ambartsumyan

Constipation is a common condition among children and adolescents that can often be easily resolved. But when it goes untreated, constipation can lead to much more serious issues such as fecal incontinence.

Dr. Lusine Ambartsumyan is just one of Seattle Children’s gastroenterology specialists partnering with primary care physicians to offer patients the best treatment available. She has offered the following advice to providers treating constipation and incontinence in children and adolescents. Read full post »

Emergency or Urgent Care? New Guide Available for Referring Providers

Seattle Children’s has a new Emergency or Urgent Care? Referral Guide (PDF) to help providers determine whether to refer a patient to Seattle Children’s Emergency Department or to one of our Urgent Care Clinics.

The guide includes a list of conditions, and where patients with those conditions should be seen. It also includes information the Emergency Department and Urgent Care Clinic staff need when you call, as well as diagnostics, pharmacy and Read full post »

Seattle Children’s Launches New Celiac Disease Program

A Q&A with Dr. Dale Lee

Seattle Children’s recently launched a new Celiac Disease Program within its Gastroenterology Division. This program gives patients access to physicians and registered dietitians specially trained and experienced in working with pediatric patients with celiac disease.

Dr. Dale Lee, director of the Celiac Disease Program, addresses questions related to celiac disease, the new program and services it offers.

Thank you to Dr. Wendy Sue Swanson, a pediatrician at The Everett Clinic in Mill Creek, a member of Seattle Children’s medical staff and executive director of Digital Health, and author of the Seattle Mama Doc blog, for submitting these questions.

There is certainly public interest in gluten-free diets. Help us put in context those who seem to feel healthier and happier off gluten, and those who must be off gluten.

Gluten is commonplace in our modern diet and individuals can have a variety of conditions related to gluten.

  • Celiac disease is an immune-mediated hypersensitivity to gluten that results in intestinal inflammation/damage that can occur in certain genetically susceptible individuals.
  • Wheat allergy is different than celiac disease, but is also immune-mediated and can result in a variety of symptoms including rash, abdominal pain, vomiting or breathing difficulties.
  • Non-celiac gluten sensitivity (also referred to as “gluten intolerance”) does not involve an immunological response, but the symptoms can be similar to celiac disease, such as abdominal pain, vomiting or diarrhea.

Read full post »

Seattle Children’s Launches New Celiac Disease Program

A Q&A With Dr. Dale Lee

Image of Dale Lee

Dale Lee

Seattle Children’s recently launched a new Celiac Disease Program within its Gastroenterology Division. This program gives patients access to physicians and registered dietitians specially trained and experienced in working with pediatric patients with celiac disease.

Dr. Dale Lee, director of the Celiac Disease Program, addresses questions related to celiac disease, the new program and services it offers. Read full post »

Glue Embolization a Game-Changer in Treating Venous Malformations in Extremities

A Q&A With Drs. Giri Shivaram, Antoinette Lindberg and Eric Monroe

Image Giri Shivaram.

Giri Shivaram

In 2013, members of the Vascular Anomalies team at Seattle Children’s developed a method to use a medical version of super glue to treat venous malformations in the head and neck area. This glue embolization process has been highly successful in removing malformations altogether.

After seeing how well the process worked, interventional radiologists Drs. Giri Shivaram and Eric Monroe and orthopedic surgeon Dr. Antoinette Lindberg decided to try using it to treat malformations in extremities. Read full post »

Growing Pains in Children and Adolescents

A Q&A With Dr. Suzanne Yandow

Image of Suzanne Yandow

Suzanne Yandow

Dr. Suzanne Yandow, chief of Orthopedics and Sports Medicine at Seattle Children’s, addresses questions about growing pains in children and adolescents.

Thank you to Dr. Wendy Sue Swanson, a pediatrician at The Everett Clinic in Mill Creek, a member of Seattle Children’s medical staff and executive director of Digital Health, and author of the Seattle Mama Doc blog, for submitting these questions.

Are there new updates or insights as to who gets growing pains?

No. They’re not well understood scientifically. The belief of what causes growing pains is that bone grows first, which then stimulates the growth of muscle and soft tissue. It’s during this period of rapid skeletal growth that the muscles and tendons lag behind the bone growth, causing a discomfort for kids because of the increased stretch and pressure. Read full post »

Overuse Injuries Among Young Athletes

A Q&A With Seattle Children’s Sports Medicine Specialists

Image of Monique Burton

Monique Burton

Experts from Seattle Children’s Sports Medicine Program, including Drs. Monique Burton, Celeste Quitiquit and John Lockhart, address questions about overuse injuries in young athletes.

Thank you to Dr. Wendy Sue Swanson, a pediatrician at The Everett Clinic in Mill Creek, a member of Seattle Children’s medical staff and executive director of Digital Health, and author of the Seattle Mama Doc blog, for submitting these questions. Read full post »