Referrals

All Articles in the Category ‘Referrals’

Ten Reasons to Refer Young Adults With Cancer to Seattle Children’s

Did you know that most cancer patients in their 20s should be referred to a pediatric cancer center for treatment rather than an adult one? Yet the pediatric oncologists at Seattle Children’s routinely talk to new patients who initially were sent to an adult cancer program because they were over 18 years old.

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Referral Backlog Reduced to 24 to 36 Hours

Seattle Children’s has been able to significantly reduce the referral backlog that has slowed our intake process over the last two months. We are now taking 24 to 36 hours to process incoming referrals (which means to finalize them and put them in the queue) – down from 2 to 3 days earlier in January. They are triaged and scheduled after that.  The backlog in referrals originated with unanticipated staffing shortages in our clinical intake team in December. We are continuing to train and onboard new staff to ensure prompt attention to all provider referrals. Thank you for your patience.

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What to Expect When Referring Your Patient for Medication Management

As a reminder, patients referred to Psychiatry for medication management will receive consultation and short-term management. We do not provide ongoing medication management.

Short-term medication management can range from two visits — for intake and recommendation/prescription — to taking over care for a few months to oversee a trial of medication. We require patients to be in therapy before considering medications, but therapy does not have to be with us. If the patient is requesting a second opinion on medication, we will see them and then provide recommendations to the referring provider, who would continue to provide ongoing care and medication management.

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New Referral Guidelines: Dermatology, Rehab Medicine and Biochemical Genetics

Dermatology Now Requires a Referral for All New Patients

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An Improving Outlook for Babies With Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia (CDH): A Q&A With Dr. Rebecca Stark

Rebecca Stark

Rebecca Stark, MD, FACS, is a board-certified pediatric surgeon in the Division of Pediatric General and Thoracic Surgery at Seattle Children’s and an Assistant Professor of Surgery at UW.  She is director of the Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia Program and surgical co-director of the ECMO Program at Seattle Children’s.

What is CDH?

Dr. Stark: When a baby’s diaphragm doesn’t form completely before birth, it leaves a hole between their abdomen and chest. Organs that should grow in the belly go through the hole up into the chest. Babies with CDH have small lungs as a result, and the lung tissue itself is different. Babies with CDH may have serious breathing problems starting soon after birth, as well as a low blood pressure and elevated heart rate. Read full post »

Psychiatry: New Telephone Triage Line for Referring Providers

A new telephone line is now available for providers who have questions about referring to Seattle Children’s outpatient psychiatry and behavioral medicine (PBM). Providers are welcome to use it to find out what services we have available now or may have available soon and ask questions about the referral process or the status of a referral already submitted.

Outpatient psychiatry referral intake team: 206-987-2164, option 2.

The line is staffed Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.  Messages will be answered within 48 hours.

The phone line is also open to patients and families who have questions about our PBM services.  

Where to Refer Concussion Patients at Seattle Children’s

A new algorithm helps PCPs know where to refer patients for concussion at Seattle Children’s.

  • Neurology sees patients who have had ongoing headache for over two months, in the absence of a sports injury.
  • Sports Medicine sees patients who experienced a sports injury concussion, are at least 6 years old and have not experienced any of the following: hospitalization for more than 24 hours, skull fracture, intracranial hemorrhage, focal neurological deficit or neurosurgery/brain surgery of any kind in the past.
  • Rehabilitation Medicine sees all other concussion patients.

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Seattle Children’s Tri-Cities Clinic Is Moving

To better serve the Tri-Cities and surrounding region, Seattle Children’s Tri-Cities Clinic is moving to a larger, more centrally located clinic location opening March 11, 2021, in Kennewick, WA. The clinic will continue to offer the same pediatric specialties, with more room to help meet the growing need for specialty pediatric care in the region.

The new clinic in Kennewick will open Thursday, March 11, 2021, and will replace the clinic in Richland, WA, which will close for good at the end of the day on Thursday, March 4, 2021.

New Clinic Address: 8232 W. Grandridge Blvd., Kennewick, WA 99336 (near Costco)

Clinic and Appointments: 509-582-1700

Provider to Provider Line: 206-987-7777

Online: seattlechildrens.org/tri-cities Read full post »

Updates to Referral Criteria for Eating Disorders

During the COVID-19 pandemic, there has been a significant rise in the number and severity of patients with eating disorders. Given the high demand, Seattle Children’s Eating Disorders program is currently focusing our limited resources on patients who are medically unstable. We are prioritizing new visits for patients under the age of 18 who meet one of the following criteria:

  • Heart rate < 60 bpm
  • Weight loss of >10% over the past 3 months
  • Abnormal laboratory work-up
  • Abnormal EKG

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New Rheumatology Algorithms and Referral Guidelines

Seattle Children’s Rheumatology has created new algorithms and other resources to support PCPs in managing some conditions that are commonly referred for specialty care.

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