Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine

All Articles in the Category ‘Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine’

Mental Health: Talking With Patients and Families About Suicide

Conversations with Families About Suicide Prevention and Safe Firearm Storage

September is Suicide Prevention Month and a timely reminder that there are many ways providers can help identify and support youth who are struggling with mental health issues and suicidal ideation. 

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Washington’s Free Mental Health Referral Service for Children and Teens: Update on Wait Times for Families and BIPOC Provider Access

Washington’s free referral service connecting kids with mental health therapists has expanded this year to meet rising demand. With new state funding, Washington’s Mental Health Referral Service for Children and Teens this summer added two referral specialists and an intake coordinator.

Wait times: Currently, the service is able to schedule an intake call for families with Medicaid within a few days to a week of the initial request. Privately insured families typically will have an intake appointment within two weeks. Times are subject to change.

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New Spanish-Language Class for Families: Where to Start When Looking for Mental Health Care

Seattle Children’s is now offering our recently introduced class, “Finding Mental Health Care in Washington State: A Class on Where to Start,” in Spanish too. The class will be offered virtually (on Zoom) starting in July. It is a live class and includes a question-and-answer session.

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Generation REACH: A Year of Progress Toward Transforming Youth Mental Health

Last May, Seattle Children’s launched Generation REACH, a multifaceted initiative based on the simple yet transformative premise that child health always includes mental health.

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Eating Disorders Clinic Offers New Intensive Outpatient Program

We are pleased to announce the launch of a new intensive outpatient program (IOP) at Seattle Children’s for patients with eating disorders. The Eating Disorders IOP is designed for children and youth with high-acuity eating disorders who don’t require inpatient care but need more than typical outpatient care can provide.

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Mental Health Resource Rundown: New Programs and Classes at Seattle Children’s

May Is National Mental Health Awareness Month

Seattle Children’s is bolstering its continuum of care for child mental health. In terms of prevention, at one end of the continuum, we are adding new classes that help parents and caregivers support their child’s mental health and recognize the signs and symptoms of mental health problems to intervene early. We are also filling in key gaps that have long existed at the high-acuity end of the continuum by creating intensive outpatient programs (IOPs) for kids who have been in crisis and stabilized, so they can transition home successfully with continued improvement rather than slip back into crisis. Our work with state legislators last year helped secure pilot funding for IOPs and partial hospitalization programs. New wins in Olympia this year ensured Medicaid covered the treatment starting in 2023.

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Big Wins for Kids in 2022 State Legislative Session

We are pleased to report that Seattle Children’s and its allies came away from the 2022 Washington state legislative session with a number of important achievements.

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Grand Rounds

Provider Grand Rounds

Year-round on Thursdays from 8 to 9 a.m. Learn more.

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Delivering Mental Health Services in Primary Care: FAST Programs Make It Easier

Offering mental health services in places that are already familiar to and visited by youth – including their primary care doctor’s office – is a pediatric health priority. To support this important work, the Partnership Access Line (PAL) has created a one-stop-shop for therapy training and materials, packaged by diagnosis (i.e. depression, anxiety, etc.).

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Grand Rounds – March 2022

Provider Grand Rounds

Year-round on Thursdays from 8 to 9 a.m. Learn more.

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