Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine

All Articles in the Category ‘Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine’

Psychiatry: New Telephone Triage Line for Referring Providers

A new telephone line is now available for providers who have questions about referring to Seattle Children’s outpatient psychiatry and behavioral medicine (PBM). Providers are welcome to use it to find out what services we have available now or may have available soon and ask questions about the referral process or the status of a referral already submitted.

Outpatient psychiatry referral intake team: 206-987-2164, option 2.

The line is staffed Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.  Messages will be answered within 48 hours.

The phone line is also open to patients and families who have questions about our PBM services.  

Openings in Program for Parents/Caregivers of Teens with ADHD; Diagnostic Screening Included

Enrollment is open for the Boosting Teens with ADHD Program, a monthlong, Zoom-based group program for parents and caregivers of teenagers ages 13 to 17 with ADHD. The group meets weekly and promotes skills focused on parent/teen communication, improving teen independence, and dealing with challenging behaviors and school problems. Read full post »

Online Suicide Prevention Training for Providers

To address suicide as a public health crisis, leading experts and healthcare organizations have collaborated to develop All Patients Safe: Suicide Prevention for Medical Professionals. This interactive, online suicide prevention training is designed for medical professionals and client-facing staff in Washington state. It offers an engaging and informative option for providers to become better skilled at suicide prevention and includes perspectives of real patients coupled with practical skills to help medical providers transfer what they learn to their practice and community. Read full post »

New Mental Health Clinic for Spanish-Speaking Patients and Families

Seattle Children’s is pleased to announce the opening of a new mental health clinic for children and their families who primarily speak Spanish.

The clinic serves children ages 2 to 18 who have mental health concerns and their parents and other caregivers. Providers are bilingual.

The CALMA clinic (short for Child and Adolescent Latino Mental Health Assessment and Treatment) is held every Thursday and includes group therapy, which may be in the daytime or evening. Presently services are by telehealth only. Read full post »

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Helps Teens With Concussion-Related Mental Health Problems

A new study published in JAMA Network Open shows that providing cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) as part of a collaborative care model for youth who have experienced persistent post-concussive symptoms (PPCS) offers a promising treatment to alleviate symptoms and improve functioning.

Every year, an estimated 1.1 to 1.9 million youth suffer a sports-related concussion. Between 20% and 30% of those experience symptoms that last more than 30 days, including mental health challenges such as depression or anxiety. Yet there is a lack of high-quality evidence to guide best practices for the treatment of PPCS in the pediatric population. Read full post »

North Clinic in Everett Now Offers Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine

Outpatient psychiatry services are now available at Seattle Children’s North Clinic in Everett. Providers at the North Clinic are offering:

  • Diagnostic evaluations for depression, anxiety and early childhood disorders
  • Stepped-care treatment for anxiety and externalizing behaviors (focusing on groups with some individual/family therapy)
  • Parent management training
  • Individual therapy for depressive disorders (very limited; by internal referral only)
  • Treatment of young children focusing on parent management training

Read full post »

Partnership Access Line: A Resource for Providers to Support Patients’ Mental Health Care

Significant mental health impacts on kids during the COVID-19 pandemic mean services like the Partnership Access Line (PAL) hotline are more important than ever. PAL supports the PCP community in treating their pediatric patients in several ways:

  1. Specialized support in all areas of child and adolescent mental health to community prescribers that lack resources and cannot complete a care plan
  2. Rapid access to in-person or telemedicine consultations for any child with Medicaid coverage; eligibility determined during a PAL call
  3. Mental health resource support for PCPs and expansion resource support for families
  4. Evidence-supported mental health training for primary care providers with Category 1 CME credit
  5. Publishes Primary Care Principles for Child Mental Health manual containing evidence-supported care guidelines for treating providers

Read full post »

Mental Health Referral Service for Kids: Additional Capacity Coming in January

Research shows that COVID-19 is taking the greatest mental health toll on children and teens ages 11 to 17. Demand for counseling and treatment for this age group is high and growing. Washington’s Mental Health Referral Service for Children and Teens receives about 20 calls a day from families needing help, and the wait time to be connected to an available provider in their community is currently about 9 weeks. The service is adding more staff in January and hopes to bring wait times down to the two-week level of this summer.

“We recommend families not be daunted by the current wait and call us right away to start the process,” says Ana Clark, manager of the Partnership Access Line program (PAL). “We provide education over the phone and can get them started on the right track. Some families are able to find providers on their own after our initial guidance and recommendations. And for those families who need a little more help, they will be added to our wait list and helped as soon as we are able. Our goal is to help families as quickly as possible.” Read full post »

Accessing Youth Mental Health Services and Support During COVID-19: A Q&A With Erika Miller, BSN, RN-BC; Kashi Arora; and Sophie King, MHA

Erika Miller is the clinical practice manager of Psychiatry Consult Services and Emergency Department Mental Health, Seattle Children’s. Kashi Arora is the mental and behavioral health project manager with Community Health, Seattle Children’s. Sophie King is the supervisor of program operations for triage and the Crisis Care Clinic, Seattle Children’s.

Q: What mental health services does Seattle Children’s offer?

A: We offer short-term, outpatient mental health services through our Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine (PBM) team. We start with a diagnostic evaluation to determine the patient’s needs and the evidence-based interventions recommended for these needs. We also discuss with families where it would be most helpful to receive care (either at Seattle Children’s or in the community).

In order to provide equitable and efficient care, many of our treatment programs operate using a stepped care model. They begin with a group or class for patients/caregivers, followed by short-term individual therapy as needed. Capacity for individual therapy is very limited. For youth pursuing medication, we offer a brief consultation model. We do not provide long-term therapy or medication management. Read full post »

Recognizing and Treating Anxiety

A Q&A With Dr. Kendra Read

Anxiety affects 30% of children and adolescents at some point in their lives. Of those, 8.3% are severely impaired by it.

Anxiety in children can be a part of normal development, but unhealthy levels of anxiety can lead to significant distress and impairment in school, social and home functioning.

Unfortunately, patients with anxiety disorders do not always receive the help they need. When they do receive treatment, it is often insufficient or not evidence based.

We spoke with Dr. Kendra Read, an attending psychologist within Seattle Children’s Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine department, to find out how providers can identify childhood anxiety, which treatment options are most effective and what information they should provide to parents. Read on to learn more. Read full post »