Provider Q&A

All Articles in the Category ‘Provider Q&A’

An Improving Outlook for Babies With Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia (CDH): A Q&A With Dr. Rebecca Stark

Rebecca Stark

Rebecca Stark, MD, FACS, is a board-certified pediatric surgeon in the Division of Pediatric General and Thoracic Surgery at Seattle Children’s and an Assistant Professor of Surgery at UW.  She is director of the Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia Program and surgical co-director of the ECMO Program at Seattle Children’s.

What is CDH?

Dr. Stark: When a baby’s diaphragm doesn’t form completely before birth, it leaves a hole between their abdomen and chest. Organs that should grow in the belly go through the hole up into the chest. Babies with CDH have small lungs as a result, and the lung tissue itself is different. Babies with CDH may have serious breathing problems starting soon after birth, as well as a low blood pressure and elevated heart rate. Read full post »

Managing Epilepsy and Seizures: A Q&A With Dr. Rusty Novotny

Dr. Rusty Novotny is the director of Seattle Children’s Epilepsy Program.

How common is epilepsy?

Rusty Novotny

Dr. Novotny: About 0.6% of kids have active epilepsy. If you imagine an elementary school with 500 students, that’s about 3 kids.

The highest incidence of pediatric seizures is in the newborn period and then it drops dramatically; it’s lowest in adolescence and continues to gradually increase as a function of age. Febrile seizures (from fever) are most common in children between 6 months and 6 years old. We rarely see febrile seizures in kids over 6 years old in the absence of other underlying risk factors. This is great because it means that kids can “outgrow” the risk of a seizure recurrence with febrile seizures and certain types of seizures in epilepsy syndromes we see in children.

One in 10 people will have a seizure at some point in their life. Read full post »

“We Have Something Special Here:” A Q&A With the Heart Center’s Dr. David Mauchley

Dr. Mauchley is a cardiac surgeon. He joined Seattle Children’s Heart Center in February 2020.

What drew you to Seattle Children’s?

David Mauchley

Dr. Mauchley: I grew up in the Pacific Northwest in Moscow, Idaho, and went to medical school at the University of Washington. My wife is also from Washington state, and we met in medical school. We always hoped there would be an opportunity to move back to Seattle to be closer to family. Read full post »

Equity in Primary Care: A Q&A With Dr. Tumaini Coker, New Division Chief of General Pediatrics

Tumaini Coker, MD, MBA, took on a new role as Seattle Children’s division chief of general pediatrics in January 2021.

A lot of people don’t know exactly what Seattle Children’s General Pediatrics division is. Can you tell us about its purpose and makeup?

Dr. Tumaini Coker

Dr. Coker: We are a group of nearly 60 faculty in academic general pediatrics. We are clinicians, educators, researchers and advocates. Our faculty members practice primary care pediatrics and teach students and residents across multiple clinical sites, such as Odessa Brown Children’s Clinic, Harborview Pediatric Clinics and UW Neighborhood clinics, to name a few. Faculty investigators conduct research across a wide range of topics that impact child and family health and wellness, from autism, to concussion in young athletes, to environmental health. In addition to our clinical and research programs, we have multiple fellowship training programs, including our newest fellowship in Child Health Equity Research, and fellowships in pediatric injury research, health services and quality of care research, child abuse medicine and sports medicine. Read full post »

Dr. Shaquita Bell Talks About the Future of Odessa Brown Children’s Clinic

When Dr. Shaquita Bell started working at Seattle Children’s Odessa Brown Children’s Clinic (OBCC) as a resident in 2006, she felt like she’d been transported back to her home in Minneapolis.

“I identify as Black and Native (my dad is Black and my mom is Cherokee), and I wanted to work in a place where I could see myself and my family reflected, serving a community like the one I came from,” Shaquita says, “I found that at OBCC.”

When Dr. Ben Danielson left Children’s in November, Shaquita was appointed OBCC interim medical director.  InHouse asked her about the recent leadership change, how she is addressing racism in healthcare and the future of OBCC. Read full post »

Common Urology Questions: A Q&A With Dr. Nicolas Fernandez

Nicolas Fernandez

Dr. Nicolas Fernandez is a pediatric urologist. He joined Seattle Children’s in 2020. An artist also, he illustrated the images for this article.

Q: When does buried penis in an obese child require surgery?

Dr. Fernandez: This is a very interesting topic. Genital, and more specifically penile, appearance is very subjective and varies from culture to culture. There are three different types of buried penis, also known as hidden penis.

  1. Secondary to obesity
  2. Secondary to poor penile pubic and penoscrotal fixation of the skin
  3. Secondary to prior penile surgery that creates a trapped penis

Read full post »

Getting the COVID-19 Vaccines to Healthcare Workers and Children: A Q&A With Dr. Danielle Zerr

Dr. Danielle Zerr is medical director of infection prevention at Seattle Children’s.

Is vaccination underway at Seattle Children’s?

Dr. Zerr: Yes. We are pleased to say that Seattle Children’s began vaccinating its workforce for COVID-19 on Dec. 16, 2020. To date, we have received four shipments of the Pfizer vaccine (975 doses each) .  We expect the vaccine supply allocated to us by the Washington State Department of Health to arrive in weekly shipments. Like other healthcare systems in Washington, Seattle Children’s has limited information at this time about the types and quantities of vaccines we will receive in the near future. As we learn more, we will share.

We rely on information from the CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) and state and local public health authorities to guide our decisions on safe and equitable distribution of our vaccine supply. Read full post »

Rheumatology in Children and Teens: A Q&A With Dr. Susan Shenoi

Susan Shenoi, MBBS, MS, RhMSUS, is interim division chief of Rheumatology at Seattle Children’s.

What’s new in Rheumatology at Seattle Children’s?

Dr. Shenoi: We are very excited that we have established a Myositis Center of Excellence, which is one of only four in the country and the only one on the West Coast.  This began last year, in May 2019, and has been made possible with a grant from the Cure Juvenile Myositis foundation. It has been very well received by families and colleagues.

We see kids with inflammatory myositis, most of which is juvenile dermatomyositis (JM) and some of which is polymyositis and overlap syndrome. It’s a multidisciplinary clinic. Patients see a rheumatologist, a physical therapist, a research coordinator and a nurse. We have volunteer support from a Cure JM board member, Suzanne Edison, who provides additional support to families, and we are fortunate to have pilot funding for a psychologist in this program as well.

We are using validated disease activity measurement to track children’s disease status and activity over time. Because of all the research underway and high demand for our clinic, we’ve doubled our capacity over the last year to serve more kids. We now see patients once a month at the hospital and once a month at the Bellevue clinic, both in person and via telemedicine. Read full post »

Accessing Youth Mental Health Services and Support During COVID-19: A Q&A With Erika Miller, BSN, RN-BC; Kashi Arora; and Sophie King, MHA

Erika Miller is the clinical practice manager of Psychiatry Consult Services and Emergency Department Mental Health, Seattle Children’s. Kashi Arora is the mental and behavioral health project manager with Community Health, Seattle Children’s. Sophie King is the supervisor of program operations for triage and the Crisis Care Clinic, Seattle Children’s.

Q: What mental health services does Seattle Children’s offer?

A: We offer short-term, outpatient mental health services through our Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine (PBM) team. We start with a diagnostic evaluation to determine the patient’s needs and the evidence-based interventions recommended for these needs. We also discuss with families where it would be most helpful to receive care (either at Seattle Children’s or in the community).

In order to provide equitable and efficient care, many of our treatment programs operate using a stepped care model. They begin with a group or class for patients/caregivers, followed by short-term individual therapy as needed. Capacity for individual therapy is very limited. For youth pursuing medication, we offer a brief consultation model. We do not provide long-term therapy or medication management. Read full post »

Kids’ Sports and Physical Activity During COVID-19: A Q&A With Drs. Monique Burton and Celeste Quitiquit

Dr. Monique Burton and Dr. Celeste Quitiquit are both sports medicine pediatricians. Dr. Burton is medical director of sports medicine and Dr. Quitiquit is co-medical director of the athletic training program at Seattle Children’s.

What does the sports landscape look like for kids this fall?

headshot of Dr. Monique Burton

Monique Burton

headshot of Dr. Celeste Quitiquit

Celeste Quitiquit

Drs. Burton and Quitiquit: Youth sports definitely looks different this fall. Some sporting teams are in full effect, with fingers crossed. Other teams already cancelled their seasons in advance. Many sporting teams tread carefully, building safety and contingency plans, creating hybrid practice agendas and trying to stay current with COVID-related news. To say there are some modifications is definitely an understatement. For example, the Washington Interscholastic Activities Association (WIAA) has divided the upcoming school year into four sports seasons rather than the usual three, limiting play in fall and moving more play to spring. Almost all of November and December will be a no-play period during which WIAA will reassess plans for 2021 based on what’s happening with COVID-19. It’s very much a fluid, “stay tuned” type of situation. Read full post »