Article

All Articles in the Category ‘Article’

Meet Dr. Mignon Loh: Seattle Children’s New Leader of Cancer and Blood Disorders Care and Research

Seattle Children’s recently named Mignon Loh, MD, the new leader of Cancer and Blood Disorders Care and Research

Meet Dr. Mignon Loh

Seattle Children’s is thrilled to introduce Dr. Mignon Loh as our new leader of Cancer and Blood Disorders Care and Research. Dr. Loh joins us from the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) Benioff Children’s Hospitals, where her titles included Chief of Pediatric Oncology. Her vision: Keep Seattle Children’s at the leading edge of pediatric cancer and blood disorders care, while building on our research progress to make Seattle Children’s a driving force behind more advances that cure children worldwide.

Read full post »

Seattle Children’s Welcomes Dr. Burt Yaszay as Chief of Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

AUTHOR: KATHRYN MUELLER

Seattle Children’s is excited to welcome Dr. Burt Yaszay as the new chief of Orthopedics and Sports Medicine at Seattle Children’s. Yaszay comes to Seattle Children’s with a bright vision for the future, as well as a deep respect for the roots in which Seattle Children’s was founded.

Read full post »

Case Study: Chronic Recurrent Multifocal Osteomyelitis (CRMO) Presenting as Bony Pain in a Young Soccer Player

Authors: Natalie Rosenwasser and Dan (Yongdong) Zhao

Related Reading: When Bone Pain Isn’t What You Think: Recognizing CRMO in Primary Care, Provider News, December 2021.

Read full post »

Seattle Children’s Researchers Discover That Nanobodies Could Pack the Biggest Punch Against COVID-19 Variants and Resurgence

By Elizabeth Dimarco, On the Pulse, December 2021

When the worst pandemic of the century struck, a group of nine Seattle Children’s Research Institute’s scientists teamed up with researchers from Rockefeller University to innovate powerful tools for diagnosing and treating a virus that has claimed over 5 million lives.

Read full post »

Small or Missing Ears: A Q&A on Microtia and Aural Atresia With Dr. Randall Bly

Dr. Randall Bly is an assistant professor of the Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery through the University of Washington School of Medicine, and the co-director of the Cranial Base Program at Seattle Children’s. With a background in mechanical engineering, he also serves as adjunct faculty through the UW College of Engineering. Bly leads a group of surgeon-scientists and engineers at the BioRobotics lab in designing cutting-edge innovations in surgery.

How common are microtia and aural atresia?

headshot of Dr. Randall Bly

Randall Bly

Dr. Bly: Microtia is a small or absent ear. About 1 in 5,000 babies are born with it annually in the United States.   In most cases, it is only on one side. Seventy percent of these children also lack an ear canal (called aural atresia).

We don’t know what causes microtia in most cases. Sometimes it’s genetic, but no specific gene has been identified. In some cases, it’s related to maternal diabetes during pregnancy, exposure to high doses of vitamin A, or a mother’s use of Accutane (isotretinoin) during pregnancy. Read full post »

Dr. Shaquita Bell Talks About the Future of Odessa Brown Children’s Clinic

When Dr. Shaquita Bell started working at Seattle Children’s Odessa Brown Children’s Clinic (OBCC) as a resident in 2006, she felt like she’d been transported back to her home in Minneapolis.

“I identify as Black and Native (my dad is Black and my mom is Cherokee), and I wanted to work in a place where I could see myself and my family reflected, serving a community like the one I came from,” Shaquita says, “I found that at OBCC.”

When Dr. Ben Danielson left Children’s in November, Shaquita was appointed OBCC interim medical director.  InHouse asked her about the recent leadership change, how she is addressing racism in healthcare and the future of OBCC. Read full post »

New NICU Puts the Focus on Families

Seattle Children’s Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) moved on March 1, 2021, to a newly remodeled, state-of-the-art facility occupying the whole fourth floor of the hospital’s Forest A section. Careful planning for the expanded space included listening to input from providers, staff and families who have used the NICU to create a family-friendly environment of care.

The NICU is designed to create a healing environment and empower parents to participate in their baby’s care both at the hospital and in preparation for discharge.

“Our new NICU space is built on a philosophy of family engagement,” says NICU director Lori Chudnofsky. “We’re focusing more robustly than ever on helping families to be involved in their baby’s care in every way possible, like holding their baby, kangaroo care, participating in provider rounds and care conferences, and finding a quiet space for self-care without leaving the NICU.” Read full post »

Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia (CDH): Seattle Children’s Care Protocols and Survival Outcomes Among the Best in the Nation

CDH is a complex disease that often requires lifelong follow-up care with many specialists. Children cared for by a multidisciplinary, integrated team have better outcomes and live healthier lives.

Seattle Children’s CDH program offers the best care and outcomes in the Northwest and is a destination center for families living in U.S. western states and abroad.   Read full post »

Case Study: Management of a Complex CSF Leak Causing Recurrent Meningitis (Cranial Base Program)

By Randall Bly, MD

Summary:

A 6-year-old male was referred to Seattle Children’s by his primary care provider (PCP) for an evaluation of meningoencephalocele and probable cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak. The patient received state-of-the-art care at Seattle Children’s from a multidisciplinary care team of physicians and surgeons from the Cranial Base Program, which led to a carefully planned, complex surgery that repaired the leak and resolved his accompanying health problems.

Patient History:

TB is a 6-year old male with a complex medical history, including repairs of his cleft lip and palate from an outside hospital, meningoencephalocele, recurrent meningitis requiring multiple hospital admissions, conductive hearing loss and velopharyngeal insufficiency. His PCP referred him to Seattle Children’s for suspected CSF leak due to his clear nasal drainage, headaches and recurrent meningitis. His episodes of meningitis had been challenging to treat, requiring multiple days of IV antibiotics. Read full post »

Pre-natal Vitamin D and Children’s Neurocognitive Development: Seattle Children’s Study Highlights the Connection and Equity Issues

A study led by Melissa Melough of Seattle Children’s Research Institute sheds light on the benefits of vitamin D intake by pregnant women to their child’s brain development as well as the significantly higher risk of vitamin D deficiency among pregnant women of color. Vitamin D deficiency is common among the general population but Black women are at higher risk. “I hope our work brings greater awareness to this problem, shows the long-lasting implications of prenatal vitamin D for the child and their neurocognitive development, and highlights that there are certain groups providers should be paying closer attention to,” says Melough.

Read “Vitamin D Levels During Pregnancy Linked with Child IQ, Study Shows Disparities Among Black Women,” On the Pulse, Nov. 2, 2020.