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Four Things to Know When Referring to Dermatology

1. The typical wait time for new patients in Dermatology is 4 to 6 months.

Patients with less urgent conditions such as warts, molluscum contagiosum and acne can expect the longest waits.

2. Dermatology has created several new resources to help PCPs manage their patients in primary care and avoid a long wait to see a specialist.

We realize families are often anxious to have conditions like acne, warts and molluscum addressed more quickly than we can see them. To help support more timely treatment, our Dermatology team created the following resources for PCPs:

They are found on Dermatology’s recently updated Refer a Patient page. Read full post »

How to Order a PFT at Seattle Children’s

Seattle Children’s Pulmonary Diagnostics Lab conducts pulmonary function tests (PFTs) for children ages 5 through 21. The lab welcomes referrals from community providers. Patients do not need to be seen by the Pulmonary team first; they can be referred directly to the lab.

Please fax a New Appointment Request Form (PDF) (doc) to 206-987-3121 or use eReferral. Clearly state you are ordering a pulmonary function test (PFT) and which test(s) you are ordering. Read full post »

Seven useful things to know about Seattle Children’s Nephrology

1. Nephrology’s webpage has new resources for PCPs on hypertension, abnormal kidney function, hematuria and more.

The Nephrology team has updated its referral guidelines and created many new resources for PCPs to help evaluate and/or refer the following conditions:

Read full post »

Evaluating Human Trafficking In-Clinic

Seattle Children’s provides a detailed clinical pathway and resource guide for evaluating human trafficking in-clinic. See the Guidelines for Human Trafficking Evaluation developed by the Seattle Children’s Trafficking Work Group, Adolescent Medicine and community experts. Read full post »

Child Abuse During COVID-19

In May, Seattle Children’s held a workshop for providers on the incidence of child abuse during COVID-19 and harm reduction strategies. View the video recording of the workshop, “Abuse at Home: Harm Reduction Strategies During the Covid-19 Pandemic.”

Training goals for the workshop included:

  • Intimate partner violence and child abuse projections, risk factors and resource utilization during the COVID-19 pandemic
  • Potential consequences of physical distancing and quarantine across populations
  • Harm reduction strategies to use in the home
  • Community resources for people experiencing abuse or violence in the home

Seattle Children’s Outpatient Surgery Center Ousts Opioids From Surgeries

From Seattle Children’s On the Pulse blog

Eighteen months ago, Dr. Lynn Martin, an anesthesiologist and medical director of the ambulatory surgery center at Seattle Children’s, and his colleagues at the Seattle Children’s Bellevue Clinic and Surgery Center set out to reduce the use of opioids during outpatient pediatric surgeries while maintaining or improving pain management and outcomes for patients. Ultimately, they accomplished much more by successfully ousting opioid use during surgeries.

Dr. Lynn Martin

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), drug overdose deaths continue to increase in the United States. It is a problem Martin and his colleagues believe they can help address, which is what drove them to develop a novel initiative at Seattle Children’s to reduce opioids.

Martin and his colleagues completed their breakthrough quality improvement initiative to reduce opioid use, and their findings were published in Anesthesia and Analgesia. Read full post »

Preventing Child Abuse During COVID-19: A Q&A With Our Physicians

The strain on families from the COVID-19 pandemic raises serious concerns for child safety. “It’s a perfect storm,” says Christine Baker, program coordinator with Seattle Children’s Child Protection Advocacy/Outreach program. “The economic strain on families, health worries, the stress of being homebound with kids all day long, the housing insecurity for many, fear of becoming sick and losing loved ones. . . . Parents are stressed and isolated in many ways by this virus.” She notes that the depression of 2008 was followed by a three-fold increase in cases of abusive head trauma in Washington state (a diagnosis that applies only to children 2 years and younger).

The Zero Abuse Project noted last month, “Many child protection professionals believe child abuse is likely to increase during the COVID-19 pandemic because most abusers are parents or siblings who now have more complete access to the child victim. In turn, the victim may no longer have schoolteachers, faith leaders or other mandated reporters they can access for help or who may detect a sign of abuse. Children may also have reduced access to medical and mental health providers” (see Responding to Child Abuse During a Pandemic: 25 Tips for MDTs). Washington state’s child abuse hotline saw a 40% drop in calls in the week after Governor Inslee ordered all schools to close. Read full post »

Symptoms Mimicking Kawasaki Disease in Children With COVID-19

Although children don’t typically fall seriously ill from the new coronavirus, doctors in Europe are now expressing concern that children with COVID-19 have developed mysterious symptoms that mimic those appearing with Kawasaki disease.

On the Pulse asked Dr. Michael Portman, pediatric cardiologist and director of the Kawasaki Disease Clinic at Seattle Children’s, to help break this emerging issue down for parents and caregivers.

Read “Kawasaki Disease in Children With COVID-19” in On The Pulse.

Read full post »

Ways Seattle Children’s Is Zeroing in on COVID-19

When health officials learned a Seattle Children’s patient tested positive for the novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) in late February, it sent a ripple through health and scientific communities nationwide. It was the first example of community transmission in the state of Washington, indicating the virus causing COVID-19 had likely been spreading in Seattle and the surrounding region undetected.

It was a moment Seattle Children’s had prepared to face since establishing an incident command center more than one month prior. From this command center, teams from across the organization met to support advance planning and coordinate actions for a potential COVID-19 surge in the region.

“Before there were any confirmed cases in the U.S., Seattle Children’s anticipated the potential for an outbreak in our region,” says CEO Dr. Jeff Sperring. “Over the past several weeks, we have provided specialized training for our team, established strict protocols for health and hygiene, and consolidated essential supplies so we would be ready to protect our patients.” Read full post »

5 Important Things to Know About the Washington Mental Health Referral Service for Children and Teens

1. There IS a Washington Mental Health Referral Service for Children and Teens!

Washington’s Mental Health Referral Service for Children and Teens connects families to licensed providers in their local area with current availability who fit a child’s mental health needs and insurance coverage. Washington Healthcare Authority funds the referral service and Seattle Children’s operates it.

The service launched in Spring 2019, but many health care providers still don’t know about it. If you have been a subscriber to Provider News for the last year, you may have seen our April 2019 launch announcement and our update in August about the service growing.

2. It connects families to mental health providers who actually have availability and take the child’s insurance.

One of the unique features of the Washington Mental Health Referral Service is that families get connected with mental health providers who actually have availability to see their child. When a family receives a referral, it includes providers who take their child’s insurance.

There are more than 1700 pediatric mental health providers currently identified by the service. Read full post »