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Dr. Shaquita Bell Talks About the Future of Odessa Brown Children’s Clinic

When Dr. Shaquita Bell started working at Seattle Children’s Odessa Brown Children’s Clinic (OBCC) as a resident in 2006, she felt like she’d been transported back to her home in Minneapolis.

“I identify as Black and Native (my dad is Black and my mom is Cherokee), and I wanted to work in a place where I could see myself and my family reflected, serving a community like the one I came from,” Shaquita says, “I found that at OBCC.”

When Dr. Ben Danielson left Children’s in November, Shaquita was appointed OBCC interim medical director.  InHouse asked her about the recent leadership change, how she is addressing racism in healthcare and the future of OBCC. Read full post »

New NICU Puts the Focus on Families

Seattle Children’s Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) moved on March 1, 2021, to a newly remodeled, state-of-the-art facility occupying the whole fourth floor of the hospital’s Forest A section. Careful planning for the expanded space included listening to input from providers, staff and families who have used the NICU to create a family-friendly environment of care.

The NICU is designed to create a healing environment and empower parents to participate in their baby’s care both at the hospital and in preparation for discharge.

“Our new NICU space is built on a philosophy of family engagement,” says NICU director Lori Chudnofsky. “We’re focusing more robustly than ever on helping families to be involved in their baby’s care in every way possible, like holding their baby, kangaroo care, participating in provider rounds and care conferences, and finding a quiet space for self-care without leaving the NICU.” Read full post »

Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia (CDH): Seattle Children’s Care Protocols and Survival Outcomes Among the Best in the Nation

CDH is a complex disease that often requires lifelong follow-up care with many specialists. Children cared for by a multidisciplinary, integrated team have better outcomes and live healthier lives.

Seattle Children’s CDH program offers the best care and outcomes in the Northwest and is a destination center for families living in U.S. western states and abroad.   Read full post »

Case Study: Management of a Complex CSF Leak Causing Recurrent Meningitis (Cranial Base Program)

By Randall Bly, MD

Summary:

A 6-year-old male was referred to Seattle Children’s by his primary care provider (PCP) for an evaluation of meningoencephalocele and probable cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak. The patient received state-of-the-art care at Seattle Children’s from a multidisciplinary care team of physicians and surgeons from the Cranial Base Program, which led to a carefully planned, complex surgery that repaired the leak and resolved his accompanying health problems.

Patient History:

TB is a 6-year old male with a complex medical history, including repairs of his cleft lip and palate from an outside hospital, meningoencephalocele, recurrent meningitis requiring multiple hospital admissions, conductive hearing loss and velopharyngeal insufficiency. His PCP referred him to Seattle Children’s for suspected CSF leak due to his clear nasal drainage, headaches and recurrent meningitis. His episodes of meningitis had been challenging to treat, requiring multiple days of IV antibiotics. Read full post »

Pre-natal Vitamin D and Children’s Neurocognitive Development: Seattle Children’s Study Highlights the Connection and Equity Issues

A study led by Melissa Melough of Seattle Children’s Research Institute sheds light on the benefits of vitamin D intake by pregnant women to their child’s brain development as well as the significantly higher risk of vitamin D deficiency among pregnant women of color. Vitamin D deficiency is common among the general population but Black women are at higher risk. “I hope our work brings greater awareness to this problem, shows the long-lasting implications of prenatal vitamin D for the child and their neurocognitive development, and highlights that there are certain groups providers should be paying closer attention to,” says Melough.

Read “Vitamin D Levels During Pregnancy Linked with Child IQ, Study Shows Disparities Among Black Women,” On the Pulse, Nov. 2, 2020.

Seattle Children’s Sees Early Spike in Fall Mental Health Visits to ED

An autumn uptick in mental health visits to the ED is normal as school begins and days darken. This year the surge began unexpectedly early at Seattle Children’s, in August, with about 20 more visits to the ED for mental health concerns than in the previous year. September and October ED numbers are holding steady so far compared to prior years. The difference is the acuity. More kids are arriving with mental health concerns who require admission.

“We all feared the effect that isolation, the pandemic and general societal stress would have on kids,” says Russ Migita, MD, clinical director of Emergency Services. “It’s because of the great work PCPs are doing to support kids and their families that we aren’t seeing even higher numbers in the ED yet. But the busy season is just beginning. We all need to work together to advocate for more resources and options for patients and families in the community.” Read full post »

Kids’ Sports and Physical Activity During COVID-19: A Q&A With Drs. Monique Burton and Celeste Quitiquit

Dr. Monique Burton and Dr. Celeste Quitiquit are both sports medicine pediatricians. Dr. Burton is medical director of sports medicine and Dr. Quitiquit is co-medical director of the athletic training program at Seattle Children’s.

What does the sports landscape look like for kids this fall?

headshot of Dr. Monique Burton

Monique Burton

headshot of Dr. Celeste Quitiquit

Celeste Quitiquit

Drs. Burton and Quitiquit: Youth sports definitely looks different this fall. Some sporting teams are in full effect, with fingers crossed. Other teams already cancelled their seasons in advance. Many sporting teams tread carefully, building safety and contingency plans, creating hybrid practice agendas and trying to stay current with COVID-related news. To say there are some modifications is definitely an understatement. For example, the Washington Interscholastic Activities Association (WIAA) has divided the upcoming school year into four sports seasons rather than the usual three, limiting play in fall and moving more play to spring. Almost all of November and December will be a no-play period during which WIAA will reassess plans for 2021 based on what’s happening with COVID-19. It’s very much a fluid, “stay tuned” type of situation. Read full post »

Tips for Safe Firearm Storage Counseling by Providers

Firearms are the second leading cause of death among children and teens in the United States, after car crashes. One in three U.S. homes where kids live have a firearm, with 43% reporting that the firearm is kept unlocked and loaded.

Seattle Children’s offers this tip sheet (PDF) for providers on counseling families about firearms.  Many families feel comfortable discussing firearm safety with their child’s pediatrician when the conversation is approached with neutrality, privacy, respect and confidence.

Read full post »

Four Things to Know When Referring to Dermatology

1. The typical wait time for new patients in Dermatology is 4 to 6 months.

Patients with less urgent conditions such as warts, molluscum contagiosum and acne can expect the longest waits.

2. Dermatology has created several new resources to help PCPs manage their patients in primary care and avoid a long wait to see a specialist.

We realize families are often anxious to have conditions like acne, warts and molluscum addressed more quickly than we can see them. To help support more timely treatment, our Dermatology team created the following resources for PCPs:

They are found on Dermatology’s recently updated Refer a Patient page. Read full post »

How to Order a PFT at Seattle Children’s

Seattle Children’s Pulmonary Diagnostics Lab conducts pulmonary function tests (PFTs) for children ages 5 through 21. The lab welcomes referrals from community providers. Patients do not need to be seen by the Pulmonary team first; they can be referred directly to the lab.

Please fax a New Appointment Request Form (PDF) (doc) to 206-987-3121 or use eReferral. Clearly state you are ordering a pulmonary function test (PFT) and which test(s) you are ordering. Read full post »