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Ten Reasons to Refer Young Adults With Cancer to Seattle Children’s

Did you know that most cancer patients in their 20s should be referred to a pediatric cancer center for treatment rather than an adult one? Yet the pediatric oncologists at Seattle Children’s routinely talk to new patients who initially were sent to an adult cancer program because they were over 18 years old.

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The Continuous Search for Advancements in Pediatric Liver Transplant

Dr. Evelyn Hsu, Seattle Children’s division chief of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, calls liver transplantation a miracle. “You take a kid who is basically right at the edge, almost dying. You grab them back from the jaws of death and give them a liver transplant, and they are essentially restored to life.” Her vision is to move every child off the transplant list with a 100 percent survival rate so they can live their best life. (Read: “We’re Not Just Transplanting Organs, We’re Transplanting Lives,” an incredible story about the Hurtado family and their four children who have maple syrup urine disease.)

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The Brain-Gut Connection: Helping Children with Chronic Gastrointestinal Issues

Seattle Children’s is excited to welcome Dr. Hannibal Person to the Gastroenterology and Hepatology team. With expertise in general psychiatry, child and adolescent psychiatry, and pediatric gastroenterology, his focus is on building an interdisciplinary program at Seattle Children’s to help children suffering from chronic gastrointestinal symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation and pain.

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Case Study: 14-Year-Old Nonbinary Person Desiring Menstrual Suppression

Authors: Juanita Hodax, MD, Gina Sequeira, MD, MS and Catherine Sumerwell, ARNP, DNP

Summary: 14-year-old nonbinary person desiring menstrual suppression.

Patient History

J is a 14-year, 6-month-old child assigned female at birth who identifies as nonbinary and uses they/them pronouns. They have been exploring their gender for one year, initially talking with friends about gender and more recently coming out to parents and family as nonbinary about six months ago. Since then, they have been using they/them pronouns and a new chosen name and have changed their hairstyle and clothing to a more androgynous style. This has helped them feel more comfortable and confident. Parents initially struggled with using they/them pronouns, but they have been trying more and have been supportive of J.

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Meet Dr. Mignon Loh: Seattle Children’s New Leader of Cancer and Blood Disorders Care and Research

Seattle Children’s recently named Mignon Loh, MD, the new leader of Cancer and Blood Disorders Care and Research

Meet Dr. Mignon Loh

Seattle Children’s is thrilled to introduce Dr. Mignon Loh as our new leader of Cancer and Blood Disorders Care and Research. Dr. Loh joins us from the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) Benioff Children’s Hospitals, where her titles included Chief of Pediatric Oncology. Her vision: Keep Seattle Children’s at the leading edge of pediatric cancer and blood disorders care, while building on our research progress to make Seattle Children’s a driving force behind more advances that cure children worldwide.

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Seattle Children’s Welcomes Dr. Burt Yaszay as Chief of Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

AUTHOR: KATHRYN MUELLER

Seattle Children’s is excited to welcome Dr. Burt Yaszay as the new chief of Orthopedics and Sports Medicine at Seattle Children’s. Yaszay comes to Seattle Children’s with a bright vision for the future, as well as a deep respect for the roots in which Seattle Children’s was founded.

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Case Study: Chronic Recurrent Multifocal Osteomyelitis (CRMO) Presenting as Bony Pain in a Young Soccer Player

Authors: Natalie Rosenwasser and Dan (Yongdong) Zhao

Related Reading: When Bone Pain Isn’t What You Think: Recognizing CRMO in Primary Care, Provider News, December 2021.

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Seattle Children’s Researchers Discover That Nanobodies Could Pack the Biggest Punch Against COVID-19 Variants and Resurgence

By Elizabeth Dimarco, On the Pulse, December 2021

When the worst pandemic of the century struck, a group of nine Seattle Children’s Research Institute’s scientists teamed up with researchers from Rockefeller University to innovate powerful tools for diagnosing and treating a virus that has claimed over 5 million lives.

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Small or Missing Ears: A Q&A on Microtia and Aural Atresia With Dr. Randall Bly

Dr. Randall Bly is an assistant professor of the Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery through the University of Washington School of Medicine, and the co-director of the Cranial Base Program at Seattle Children’s. With a background in mechanical engineering, he also serves as adjunct faculty through the UW College of Engineering. Bly leads a group of surgeon-scientists and engineers at the BioRobotics lab in designing cutting-edge innovations in surgery.

How common are microtia and aural atresia?

headshot of Dr. Randall Bly

Randall Bly

Dr. Bly: Microtia is a small or absent ear. About 1 in 5,000 babies are born with it annually in the United States.   In most cases, it is only on one side. Seventy percent of these children also lack an ear canal (called aural atresia).

We don’t know what causes microtia in most cases. Sometimes it’s genetic, but no specific gene has been identified. In some cases, it’s related to maternal diabetes during pregnancy, exposure to high doses of vitamin A, or a mother’s use of Accutane (isotretinoin) during pregnancy. Read full post »

Dr. Shaquita Bell Talks About the Future of Odessa Brown Children’s Clinic

When Dr. Shaquita Bell started working at Seattle Children’s Odessa Brown Children’s Clinic (OBCC) as a resident in 2006, she felt like she’d been transported back to her home in Minneapolis.

“I identify as Black and Native (my dad is Black and my mom is Cherokee), and I wanted to work in a place where I could see myself and my family reflected, serving a community like the one I came from,” Shaquita says, “I found that at OBCC.”

When Dr. Ben Danielson left Children’s in November, Shaquita was appointed OBCC interim medical director.  InHouse asked her about the recent leadership change, how she is addressing racism in healthcare and the future of OBCC. Read full post »