Provider Q&A

All Articles in the Category ‘Provider Q&A’

Addressing a Family’s Sleep Issues

A Q&A With Drs. Maida Chen and Michelle Garrison

Sleep is one of the most common concerns divulged to family providers. While parents most often ask for advice related to young children, Seattle Children’s sleep experts Drs. Maida Chen and Michelle Garrison suggest providers treat the entire family when addressing sleep issues.

Read on to learn more.

Thank you to Dr. Wendy Sue Swanson, Chief of Digital Innovation for Children’s and author of the Seattle Mama Doc blog, for submitting these questions.

How does parents’ sleep impact the rest of their family?

Dr. Michelle Garrison, principal investigator, Seattle Children’s Research Institute: Sleep problems between family members are often

interconnected, so providers should look beyond the sleep habits of a specific child and consider what’s going on in a family unit.

When sleep isn’t going well, it can create what I call a “feedback loop of despair.” When children aren’t sleeping well, it can affect parent sleep as well – and then the next day, the child’s behavior can be worse and parents may have less capacity for parenting the way they want to, because they are both tired. And in turn, those effects on behavior and parenting can make bedtime even harder the next time, and you have a feedback loop. Read full post »

Identifying Fatty Liver Disease

A Q&A With Dr. Niviann Blondet

Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) – the accumulation of fat in the liver – is the most common liver disorder in the United States, affecting approximately 10% of children. Although incidence is increasing, this condition is uniquely difficult to diagnose.

To address this issue, Seattle Children’s has opened a new Fatty Liver Clinic to treat patients with a multidisciplinary approach.

“We estimate about 10 million children have fatty liver disease, but there’s a large population that goes undiagnosed,” said Dr. Niviann Blondet, a gastroenterologist at Children’s. “It’s not until they develop cirrhosis that they seek medical attention.”

Dr. Blondet offers the following information to providers in hopes that patients might be diagnosed sooner and treated more effectively.

What are the risk factors of NAFLD?

Obesity is the most significant risk factor. There is a direct correlation between NAFLD and body mass index (BMI). However, the disease can occur in children within a normal weight range.

The prevalence of NAFLD increases throughout childhood, possibly because BMI increases with age in children.

Studies have also shown an association with insulin resistance. NAFLD increases the risk of developing type 2 diabetes and may worsen glycemic control in children with diabetes and contribute to the development and progression of chronic diabetic complications.

Gender can also be a contributing factor. NAFLD is approximately 40% more common in boys than girls. Read full post »

How to Best Care for Transgender Youth

A Q&A with Dr. David Inwards-Breland

Transgender youth have unique medical needs. Finding appropriate care for these patients, and their families, can be challenging.

Seattle Children’s offers the only multidisciplinary clinic in our region for youth who are transgender or gender-nonconforming. Because demand for these services is high, patients are not always able to get scheduled at the Gender Clinic as quickly as they might like.

Dr. David Inwards-Breland, medical director of the Gender Clinic, offers the following advice to providers caring for transgender or gender-nonconforming patients who may be waiting to see a specialist at Children’s. Read full post »

Supporting Children With Autism Who Will Not Eat

A Q&A With Dr. Danielle Dolezal

Image of Danielle Dolezal

Danielle Dolezal

There are few challenges that generate as much concern and frustration for parents as feeding issues. Unfortunately, for children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), these problems are quite common. Clinical research suggests 46% to 89% of all children with ASD struggle with feeding problems.

While patients may benefit from a referral to the Pediatric Feeding Program at Seattle Children’s Autism Center, qualified specialists are not always immediately available. In the meantime, Dr. Danielle Dolezal, clinical supervisor of the Pediatric Feeding Program, offers the following advice to primary care providers who want to help waiting families. Read full post »

Tips for Treating Constipation and Incontinence

A Q&A With Dr. Lusine Ambartsumyan

Image of Lusine Ambartsumyan

Lusine Ambartsumyan

Constipation is a common condition among children and adolescents that can often be easily resolved. But when it goes untreated, constipation can lead to much more serious issues such as fecal incontinence.

Dr. Lusine Ambartsumyan is just one of Seattle Children’s gastroenterology specialists partnering with primary care physicians to offer patients the best treatment available. She has offered the following advice to providers treating constipation and incontinence in children and adolescents. Read full post »

Seattle Children’s Launches New Celiac Disease Program

A Q&A With Dr. Dale Lee

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Dale Lee

Seattle Children’s recently launched a new Celiac Disease Program within its Gastroenterology Division. This program gives patients access to physicians and registered dietitians specially trained and experienced in working with pediatric patients with celiac disease.

Dr. Dale Lee, director of the Celiac Disease Program, addresses questions related to celiac disease, the new program and services it offers. Read full post »

Glue Embolization a Game-Changer in Treating Venous Malformations in Extremities

A Q&A With Drs. Giri Shivaram, Antoinette Lindberg and Eric Monroe

Image Giri Shivaram.

Giri Shivaram

In 2013, members of the Vascular Anomalies team at Seattle Children’s developed a method to use a medical version of super glue to treat venous malformations in the head and neck area. This glue embolization process has been highly successful in removing malformations altogether.

After seeing how well the process worked, interventional radiologists Drs. Giri Shivaram and Eric Monroe and orthopedic surgeon Dr. Antoinette Lindberg decided to try using it to treat malformations in extremities. Read full post »

Growing Pains in Children and Adolescents

A Q&A With Dr. Suzanne Yandow

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Suzanne Yandow

Dr. Suzanne Yandow, chief of Orthopedics and Sports Medicine at Seattle Children’s, addresses questions about growing pains in children and adolescents.

Thank you to Dr. Wendy Sue Swanson, a pediatrician at The Everett Clinic in Mill Creek, a member of Seattle Children’s medical staff and executive director of Digital Health, and author of the Seattle Mama Doc blog, for submitting these questions.

Are there new updates or insights as to who gets growing pains?

No. They’re not well understood scientifically. The belief of what causes growing pains is that bone grows first, which then stimulates the growth of muscle and soft tissue. It’s during this period of rapid skeletal growth that the muscles and tendons lag behind the bone growth, causing a discomfort for kids because of the increased stretch and pressure. Read full post »

Overuse Injuries Among Young Athletes

A Q&A With Seattle Children’s Sports Medicine Specialists

Image of Monique Burton

Monique Burton

Experts from Seattle Children’s Sports Medicine Program, including Drs. Monique Burton, Celeste Quitiquit and John Lockhart, address questions about overuse injuries in young athletes.

Thank you to Dr. Wendy Sue Swanson, a pediatrician at The Everett Clinic in Mill Creek, a member of Seattle Children’s medical staff and executive director of Digital Health, and author of the Seattle Mama Doc blog, for submitting these questions. Read full post »